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Travel insurance for the elderly

Cheese, wine and travel: they all get better with age

There’s no rule that says only teenagers putting off university, jobs and the ‘real world’ are allowed to up sticks and travel the globe. Older people are embracing new experiences and taking off to explore new horizons, and we truly believe you’re never too old for it.

But, for those who are older, there are certain steps to take to make sure you stay as safe as possible while conquering the world, and don't miss out on anything because of misinformation or doubt.

older woman enjoying a sunset on holiday

Travel insurance for older people

The older you get, the higher the price you’ll pay for travel insurance. The reason for this is because, from an insurers point of view, older travellers are more likely to have pre-existing conditions or be more at risk of illness and injury.

The cost of travel insurance for people over a certain age might be higher, but could come with some perks such as extra emergency and medical cover.

Travel tips

Travellers of any age will benefit from following a handy holiday checklist, but what can mature travellers do to help make sure they stay healthy and happy?

Go off-peak

Travelling when you’re retired comes with many benefits, not least that you can go whenever you want. If you travel during term time, it'll likely be cheaper, less crowded and you'll find local people will have a bit more time for you. If you're going to somewhere with a hot climate, you can pick a cooler time when temperatures aren't so extreme.

Move around on the plane

Stay hydrated and get up for a walk around the plane every hour or so to keep your blood moving and lessen the chance of a blood clot. It may make sense to tell your GP how and where you're travelling too, especially if you have any underlying health issues, so follow any medical advice offered.

Travel light

If it's been a little while since you last went away, double check that you can still lift and manage your travel bag easily, and invest in a new one if not. We suggest travelling with a lightweight, wheeled suitcase that you can easily lift on and off buses and trains. Pack fewer items to keep the weight down and scout out laundry facilities when you arrive.

Plan ahead with your medication

It might not be possible to easily replace or refill any prescriptions while you’re on your travels. Book an appointment with your doctor so you can pick up everything you need for the amount of time you’re away. This will keep you safe, and will stop you from invalidating your insurance. Take your prescription with you when you're travelling with medication to get through security smoothly.

Buddy up

If you'd be travelling alone and feel worried about the idea, finding a travel companion online could be the answer.  There are several websites dedicated to helping potential travellers meet online and work out if their plans and personalities are compatible.

Sites like City Socializer, Meetup, Travel Buddies and Thelma and Louise (for women only), let you screen your potential travel buddies before taking the plunge and setting out for adventure.

Be upfront about your health

Tell your insurer about all your pre-existing medical conditions. Full disclosure is the best policy. Misleading them about your conditions could invalidate your insurance. 

What are the best options for over 65’s travel insurance?

As many travellers over the age of 65 are retired, it's possible they'll plan to be abroad more than twice a year. In that case, it's likely that a multi-trip policy, which can be renewed annually, will be cheaper than single-trip policies. The advantage is that you'll be covered from the moment you make your holiday booking - in the event of having to cancel for instance.  However, most insurers have a maximum age limit for multi-trip cover.  

You'll also need to specify where in the world you want to be covered for - for example Europe only, Rest of the World (excluding America) and including America.  As medical costs are extremely high in the USA, the cost of travel insurance is also higher.