AA Streetwatch

Results of the first survey

18 January 2010

Survey results have been analysed by postcode area as well as by region The first AA Streetwatch survey was a walking survey carried out by 1,912 AA members in autumn 2010.

Volunteers recorded the frequency of 12 categories of street blight, within two miles of their homes. These covered: potholes, road repairs, damaged kerbs, inspection covers, road works, uneven payments, blocked drains, badly-parked vehicles, litter, dog's mess, bad signs and worn road markings.

AA Streetwatch members in all 118 post code areas of the UK returned surveys.

Oldham, Blackpool(Fylde Coast) and Dartford were rated as the areas most plagued by potholes, litter, bad signs, faded road markings, uneven pavements, dogs mess and other blights on neighbourhood roads.

Highlights

The best individual areas were Taunton, Berwick & Borders, and Ipswich.

London areas did best for (fewest) Potholes and Patches. The areas most affected by Potholes and Patches were Kilmarnock, Fylde Coast and Telford.

Berwick & Borders was the cleanest 'Streetwatch' place, making the top 3 for both Litter & Dog fouling.

The Worst 'Streetwatch' areas for Litter & Dog fouling were Paisley & Liverpool respectively.


Download the full AA Streetwatch report as a pdf (2Mb)

Regions

On a regional level AA members in Wales said their streets are least plagued by potholes, litter, bad signs and road markings, uneven pavements, dogs mess and other blights on neighbourhood roads. The North East of England came off worst.

Streets in Welsh neighbourhoods also shared top spot with other regions for least problems with badly-maintained or missing road signs.

Blocked drains and litter were the problems Welsh streets suffered from most.

Streets surveyed in the North East found neighbourhoods in a poor state with potholes, road repairs, kerbs, inspection covers, road works, uneven paths, road signs, road markings and dog mess. The one redeeming feature was clear drains.

In many respects, the North East wasn't as bad as Northern Ireland, with five of the 12 categories worst in the UK (kerbs, road works, road signs, road markings and dog fouling).

However, Northern Irish neighbourhoods came out top with the least pothole problem and least perilous pavements and paths.

General

  • The most reported issue was litter (average 28.9/survey)
  • The least reported issue was road works taking place (average 1.2/survey)
  • Potholes was the issue considered most serious (rated most serious by 53% of Streetwatchers)
  • Road works was the issue considered least serious (not ranked in top 5 issues by 52% of Streetwatchers)
  • Speeding Traffic was voted the most important issue to cover in a future survey (selected top by 46%)
  • abandoned cars was voted the least important issue to cover in a future survey (ranked 9th of 9 by 37%)

Comment

AA Streetwatch is perhaps an example of the Big Society in action Commenting on the survey, Edmund King, AA president, said: "AA Streetwatch is perhaps an example of the Big Society in action. We shall share the results with local highway authorities to support our campaign for more investment in local streets and paths – neglect of these areas has a significant impact on how people feel about where they live."

The results also show that local communities can help themselves by not littering and always clearing up after their dogs.

Comments from Streetwatchers

"Good on you AA for doing this survey- great idea!"
"Enjoyed the exercise and would be keen to participate in future"
"Get as many people out doing this. I took my grandchildren and as well as exercise they enjoyed the whole experience"
"I think this is a good scheme – our council have done sterling work mending the potholes – I guess the budget won't be there for the next lot!"
"I would go as far as stating that this council appears to be acting way beyond the call of duty, I can find no issues with them and do indeed take my hat off to them, the roads here are a pleasure to drive on"


Download the full AA Streetwatch report as a pdf (2Mb)

To view the pdf file you'll need

Download Adobe® Reader® - this will open a new windowAdobe® Reader®.


Join the discussion in the AA zone

 

10 June 2011