Driving the morning after drinking

AA and Pernod Ricard UK highlight the risk of a failed breath test

AA and Pernod Ricard UK highlight the risk of a failed breath test the morning after drinking

AA and Pernod Ricard UK highlight the risk of a failed breath test the morning after drinking

The majority of drivers (56%) do not know when it is safe to drive the morning after drinking according to an AA-Populus survey of 21,000 drivers*.

Moreover, ACPO police figures illustrate the big danger of ‘morning after’ drink drivers by showing that in 2011 more people failed breath tests in the morning - between the hours of 6am and 11am - than during the hour before or after midnight.

Pernod Ricard UK and the AA have launched their fourth Christmas anti-drink driving campaign, urging drivers to “accept responsibility” before getting behind the wheel, focusing on the morning after a drinking occasion.

We don’t want the morning after to end in mourning disasters

Edmund King, AA president

Caught out

Commenting, Edmund King, AA president, said: “Too many drivers are caught out by being over the limit the morning after the night before. We don’t want the morning after to end in mourning disasters so are advising drivers to think carefully before driving after a night out.

One unit per hour

It is difficult to work out whether there is still alcohol in the system the following day.

One unit of alcohol takes about one hour to get out of the system but this is not a precise science as it depends on size, gender, whether you have eaten, the state of your liver, your metabolism and even your mood.

The best advice is if you are going to drink, don’t drive and if you are going to drive, don’t drink.

the number of units per bottle is indicated on the back of all Pernod Ricard UK products to help the public calculate their alcohol intake

Denis O’Flynn, MD of Pernod Ricard UK

Check the label

Denis O’Flynn, Managing Director of Pernod Ricard UK states, “As the Christmas season begins, Pernod Ricard UK and the AA ask drivers to pay particular attention on the roads. We urge the public to be aware of driving early in the morning after Christmas festivities. It is important that drivers pay attention to how much they are drinking - the number of units per bottle is indicated on the back of all Pernod Ricard UK products to help the public calculate their alcohol intake”.

Still over the limit

In the AA-Populus poll drivers were asked:

If you started drinking at 9pm and drank a total of 12 units of alcohol over three hours when do you think you would legally be allowed to drive again?

  • 56% either didn’t know or selected a time when they might still be over the limit.
  • 11% of 25-34 year olds thought they would be fine at 9am the next day.
  • Drivers in the North East and North West were least likely to know when it would be safe to drive (59%).
  • Drivers in Scotland, London and Eastern area were most likely to know when it might be safe (46%).

The facts

  • Provisional estimates for 2012 suggest that 280 people were killed in drink drive accidents, an increase of around 17% compared with 2011 and accounting for 16% of all road deaths in GB.
  • There was a 5% decrease in seriously injured drink drive casualties in 2012, to around 1,200 (5% of all seriously injured road casualties).
  • There were were 220 fatal drink drive accidents in 2011, resulting in 240 deaths.
  • The majority (71%) killed in drink drive accidents in 2011 were drivers and riders over the legal limit. The remaining 29% were other road users, involved in the accident but not necessarily over the drink drive limit themselves.
  • 55,300 people in England and Wales were convicted of driving after consuming alcohol or taking drugs in England and Wales, broadly in line with the number for 2011.
  • In 2011, around two thirds of all drink drive casualties and three quarters of those killed and seriously injured were male.
  • Around one third of those killed or seriously injured were aged between 16 and 24, almost 80% of whom were male.

(10 December 2013)

* 21,165 adults, aged 18+, responded to the AA-Populus online panel between 11-17 October 2013. Populus is a founder member of the British Polling Council and abides by its rules.

According to the Department for Transport, episodes of drink-driving amongst young adults are most likely to occur between the ages of 17-24. This campaign hopes to prompt young drivers to ‘accept responsibility’ and choose alternative travel arrangements before social occasions and to warn about driving the morning after.